A: CPN Number / SCN Number It is a nine digit number separate from your social security number used to track your credit activities and history such as a EIN, ITIN, TIN or SSN, but their can be other formalized government or institutionally issued 9 digit number which can be issued and used for credit purposed. Those number well protect your Social Security Number (SSN) from identity theft.

A: CPN Number / SCN Number are coming from  An independent third party Attorney.

A: No. The CPN Number / SCN Number does not replace your Social Security Number (SSN), CPN Number / SCN Number can only be used for credit reporting purposes. It cannot and should not be used for any government purposes including and not limited to: military, child support, DSS income, SSI, taxes, FHA, VA, or any government backed funding, which requires an individual to list a SSN number.

A: To obtain CPN Number / SCN Number Typically it takes 2-3 days.

A: Easy answer soon after you call us or submit our online application we can get you started. After your contract is sign we will assigned you an account manager to get your process finished as soon as possible. IT WILL TAKE 3-7 BUSINESS DAYS TO COMPLETE THIS PROCESS.

A: You can use your new CPN Number / SCN Number for any credit reporting purposes. Use it to opening a bank accounts, credit cards, personal loans, auto loans, apartments, utilities, cable, cell phones, et

A: Yes! You are responsible for all debts on your old report and debts incurred with your CPN Number / SCN Number. You must remember that while you are rebuilding your credit, you must use your new number wise

Due to certain rights guaranteed by the 1974 US Privacy Act Title V (View The 1974 Privacy Act), federal law allows the ability for someone to legally use a private ID # for financial reporting purposes instead of a Social Security Number. Title 5, Section 7 of Publication Law 93-579 of Government Organization and Employees Act:
…(a) (1) It shall be unlawful for any Federal, State or Local Government Agency to deny any individual any right, benefit, or privilege provided by law because of such individual’s refusal to disclose his or her’s Social Security Account Number.
The law states that No federal, state, or local government agency may deny you any right, privilege or benefit due to your refusal to provide your SSN for any other reason than producing money for retirement account with the Social Security Administration, the IRS and your employer today. Credit Bureaus are not legally allowed to “require” your Social Security Number. In our country’s present credit reporting system a person may be assumed guilty and then must expend a great deal of time and resources to prove his or her innocence. Additionally, once a negative item is in a credit file it may remain long past the 7 year time period most people believe is used. Additionally, a misreported item can show up in a credit report multiple times. Credit bureaus are private companies and are not affiliated with the government in any way, whatsoever. Although, the credit bureaus would like you to think otherwise.

A: Title 5 of the United States Code Annotated 552(a) known as the Privacy Act, ruled in part: “Right to privacy is a personal right designated to protect persons from the unwanted disclosure of personal information.” – CAN Financial Corp vs. Local 743, D.D., I11, 1981 15F. Sup. 943, I11.
(A)(1) “It shall be unlawful to deny any individual any right, benefit, or privilege provided by law because of such individuals refusal to disclose his or her social security account number”.
Pub. L 93-579: (B) “Any Federal, State, or Local Government Agency which requests an individual to disclose their Social Security Account Number shall inform that individual whether the disclosure is mandatory or voluntary, by what statutory or other authority such number is solicited, and what uses will be made of it.”
The Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA) prohibits creditors from denying you a loan based on reasons that have nothing to do with your credit-worthiness.

A: By understanding the law and applying credit re-establishment techniques, our proven techniques specializes in the establishment of credit through a completely separate and legal entity. With your new completely and separate legal entity, you will be able to build a new credit-worthy profile.

A: As soon as your new CPN Number / SCN Number has been assigned to you, your new credit profile is created and you can start applying for credit. 

A: YES; You can use your new credit profile obtain major credit cards, department store cards, gas cards, auto loans, bank loans, real estate, and any other type of financing you desire.

Private money lenders only not government loans.

A: The only way your new credit profile can get mixed in with your old in our program is by willingly disclosing your old credit profile information with your new one

“I would not use a CPN especially if you have questionable credit,” said John C. Heath, a credit expert and consumer attorney for Lexington Law. “It may be seen as an attempt to deceive a creditor about your creditworthiness (even if that is not your intention).”

Correct answer:  What Lexington Law is not telling you is that it is completely legal to use a CPN to conduct your personal financial business…obtaining basic consumer type credit. If you do not pay these bills that’s when you can get yourself in a heap of trouble if they prove that your intention was to purposely elude creditors and evade paying your committed debts.

“CPN sellers also often tell consumers they can apply for and receive credit from lenders and that their credit transactions will be reported to the three major credit reporting agencies — Experian, TransUnion and Equifax.”

Correct answer:   When we register the CPN number and your personal information with all three bureaus this is EXACTLY what occurs…No myth!

“Equifax asks for Social Security numbers and not alternatives,” said Nancy Bistritz, director of public relations and communications for the credit reporting agency.

TransUnion sent us a similar statement….

“TransUnion uses Social Security Numbers to identify consumer data for credit reports,” said David Blumberg, public relations director for TransUnion. “This approach is the standard for our industry because it supports the most accurate matching.”

Correct answer:   The five agencies that require you to give them your SSN do not include the private sector credit bureaus. This is the premise as to why the number is completely 100% legal for use to conduct your personal financial business without exposing your sensitive information to these bureaus that are not required on ALL levels to access it. The Equifax breach is a prime example why EVERYBODY should possess a CPN number!

“If these numbers are such scams then why are consumers in danger of prosecution when countless companies are clearly marketing and selling them without recourse. Seems that if the CPN is in fact illegal then some accountability lies with the agencies that issue them……additionally, I’ve known about the CPN for years now and have seen several individuals “start over” with them and how are lines of credit being offered and approved if reporting agencies don’t except or recognize them?”

Correct answer:  Because they are legal to have and use as long as you pay all of your bills responsibly. They just try to discourage the purchasing and use of them through manipulative ads and vague interpretation of the law betting that most consumers are dummies!

“Why does the Social Security Administration offer them if you can’t use it for anything legitimate? Doesn’t make sense.”

Correct answer: They are issued by the SSA to all immigrants when they come over to work. They tell you its not for work and its not a social security number. Then what is it?  It is a CPN used for personal financial business!

Companies offering credit privacy numbers boast two big selling points. Nonetheless, despite these supposed pros of getting a CPN, Credit Privacy Numbers end up still being a hindrance when it comes to getting a business loan.

Correct answer:   You can only use it to obtain credit and financing personally and then use the personal funds to accellerate your business.

  1. It protects your Social Security number.

People who are worried about identity theft and dislike the idea of sharing their Social Security number with anyone might get a CPN thinking they can use it as identification instead of their SSN.

In reality, however, if a lender asks for your SSN, they aren’t going to be satisfied with your credit privacy number. Think about it: You’re asking a bank to lend you tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars, trusting that you will pay it back, but you don’t trust them enough to share your SSN?

Correct answer:   This is a weak response…A CPN does protect your SSN! It is a firewall!

  1. It can help you clean up your credit history.

CPNs are often promoted as part of a plan to improve your credit. When you do an online search for “credit privacy number,” lots of credit repair programs pop up. By using the CPN, these companies claim, you can apply for credit cards, lines of credit, or loans, and the companies involved will never find out that you have bad credit.

Correct answer:  This is true in most cases…and these companies are not priveledged enough to have entitlement to your SSN credit.

However, it’s pretty obvious rather than improving your credit history, the credit privacy number is intended to hide it. And common sense will tell you that as long as the CPN is connected with you—your name, address, and other identifying information—it’s a simple matter for credit sources to uncover your credit score, no matter which ID number you use.

If anything, using a credit privacy number will make them more suspicious of your creditworthiness. And though it’s a difficult reality to face, that’s why you should focus on fixing your score instead.

Correct response:   A CPN is the first step to fixing your credit past. It allows you to stop using your SSN for credit and allows you to continue forward. Only then can you stop and fix your SSN credit. Down the road you should bring both of the files together to report together.

“NEW LAW STOPS CREDIT PROFILE NUMBERS- Superior Tradelines”

Correct answer:   There is no new law and they are not in the CPN business and do not report tradelines to CPNs. That is why they are full of reckless irresponsible banter. They have no knowledge of them and they know by talking about CPNs it will increase their Google rankings.

“What Is A CPN? Fraud Just Waiting to Happen- Wallethub”

Correct answer:   Only if you take the money that you obtained by using the CPN number and don’t repay it. They will say that you intentionally misled creditors and that is fraud! They have no knowledge of them and they know by talking about CPNs it will increase their Google rankings.

“Your One-Way Ticket to Jail, the Credit Privacy Number- Creditsesame”

Correct answer:   Only if you take the money that you obtained by using the CPN number and don’t repay it. They will say that you intentionally misled creditors and that is fraud! They have no knowledge of them and they know by talking about CPNs it will increase their Google rankings.

“What Is a Credit Privacy Number? Nerdwallet”

A credit privacy number, or CPN, is a nine-digit ID that can be used in lieu of a Social Security number for credit reporting and other financial purposes, like applying for a loan. Also called a credit profile number, a CPN is primarily used for tracking credit history or applying for loans. You’ve probably heard of CPNs in the context of credit repair: A company will promise to issue you a CPN that will make it easier to qualify for new credit or get rid of bad debts. But be careful: Sometimes, those companies are selling a service that’s useless or even outright illegal.

So why use a CPN instead of an SSN, anyway?

Like an SSN, each person can only have one CPN. It’s used as a unique identifier for your financial transactions and lets lenders and credit reporting agencies keep an eye on your borrowing history. However, a CPN can help you keep your finances safe and hidden from the public eye. For that reason, it’s popular among elected officials, celebrities and people in witness protection programs. As the name implies, it’s mostly used by people who need a little extra privacy.

A CPN isn’t always a substitute for an SSN, though: You can’t use it for documents submitted to the IRS or an employer, registering a vehicle or applying for a government loan, for instance. If you have a CPN, it’s on you to know when you can and can’t use it.

Great Seal of the United States
Long titleAn Act to amend title 5, United States Code, by adding a section 552a, to safeguard individual privacy from the misuse of Federal records, to provide that individuals be granted access to records concerning them which are maintained by Federal agencies, to establish a Privacy Protection Study Commission, and for other purposes.
Enacted bythe 93rd United States Congress
EffectiveDecember 31, 1974
Citations
Public law93-579
Statutes at Large88 Stat. 1896
Codification
Acts amendedAdministrative Procedure Act
Freedom of Information Act
Titles amended5 U.S.C.: Government Organization and Employees
U.S.C. sections created5 U.S.C. ch. 5 § 552a
Legislative history

Personal Information

right of privacy: access to personal information

The right of privacy has evolved to protect the ability of individuals to determine what sort of information about themselves is collected, and how that information is used. Most commercial websites utilize “cookies,” as well as forms, to collect information from visitors such as name, address, email, demographic info, social security number, IP address, and financial information. In many cases, this information is then provided to third parties for marketing purposes. Other entities, such as the federal government and financial institutions, also collect personal information. The threats of fraud and identity theft created by this flow of personal information have been an impetus for right of privacy legislation requiring disclosure of information collection practices, opt-out opportunities, as well as internal protections of collected information. However, such requirements have yet to reach all segments of the marketplace.

15 U.S.C. § 45 charges the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) with preventing “unfair methods of competition in or affecting commerce and unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce.” In matters of privacy, the FTC’s role is one of enforcing privacy promises made in the marketplace. Several additional laws form the foundation on which the FTC carries out this charge: the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. § 552a), the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 6801-6809), the Fair Credit Reporting Act (15 U.S.C. § 1681 et seq.), and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 6501-6506).

The Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. § 552a) protects personal information held by the federal government by preventing unauthorized disclosures of such information. Individuals also have the right to review such information, request corrections, and be informed of any disclosures. The Freedom of Information Act facilitates these processes.

The Gramm-Leach Bliley Act (also known as the Financial Modernization Act of 1999) establishes guidelines for the protection of personal financial information. Financial institutions are requiredby law (15 U.S.C. § 6803) to provide a privacy policy to customers, which explains what kinds of information are being collected and how that information is used. Such institutions are further required to develop safeguards in order to protect the information they collect from customers.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (15 U.S.C. § 1681 et seq.) protects personal financial information collected by consumer reporting agencies. The Act limits those who can access such infomation, and subsequent amendments have simplified the process by which consumers can obtain and correct the information collected about themselves. The FTC also actively enforces prohibitions on fraudulently obtaining personal financial information, a crime known as “pretexting.”

The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 6501-6506) allows parents to control what information is collected about their child (younger than 13 years old) online. Operators of websites that either target children or knowingly collect personal information from children are required to post privacy policies, obtain parental consent before collecting information from children, allow parents to determine how such information is used, and provide the option to parents to opt-out of future collection from their child.

However, despite the rights described above, other participants in the marketplace are not bound by law to develop similar protections and disclosure practices. Rather, in the remainder of the marketplace, the FTC encourages a voluntary regime of protecting consumer privacy. In two reports to Congress (19982000) though, the FTC found that most sites falling outside of the jurisdiction of the established right of privacy laws do not adequately inform consumers about collection practices, nor do the majority of sites adequately protect the privacy of visitors’ personal information. It appears that the voluntary regime is insufficient, and the prospect of further right of privacy legislation in the area of access to personal information is very real.

The Privacy Act of 1974 (Pub.L. 93–579, 88 Stat. 1896, enacted December 31, 1974, 5 U.S.C. § 552a), a United States federal law, establishes a Code of Fair Information Practice that governs the collection, maintenance, use, and dissemination of personally identifiable information about individuals that is maintained in systems of records by federal agencies. A system of records is a group of records under the control of an agency from which information is retrieved by the name of the individual or by some identifier assigned to the individual. The Privacy Act requires that agencies give the public notice of their systems of records by publication in the Federal Register. The Privacy Act prohibits the disclosure of information from a system of records absent of the written consent of the subject individual, unless the disclosure is pursuant to one of twelve statutory exceptions. The Act also provides individuals with a means by which to seek access to and amendment of their records and sets forth various agency record-keeping requirements. Additionally, with people granted the right to review what was documented with their name, they are also able to find out if the “records have been disclosed”.. and are also given the rights to make corrections.[1]

Provisions of the Privacy Act[edit]

Conditions of disclosure[edit]

The Privacy Act states in part:

No agency shall disclose any record which is contained in a system of records by any means of communication to any person, or to another agency, except pursuant to a written request by, or with the prior written consent of, the individual to whom the record pertains…[2]

There are specific exceptions to the Act that allow the use of personal records. Examples of these exceptions are:[3]

  • For statistical purposes by the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • For routine uses within a U.S. government agency
  • For archival purposes “as a record which has sufficient historical or other value to warrant its continued preservation by the United States Government”
  • For law enforcement purposes
  • For congressional investigations
  • Other administrative purposes

The Privacy Act mandates that each United States Government agency have in place an administrative and physical security system to prevent the unauthorized release of personal records.

To protect the privacy and liberty rights of individuals, federal agencies must state “the authority (whether granted by statute, or by Executive order of the President) which authorizes the solicitation of the information and whether disclosure of such information is mandatory or voluntary” when requesting information. (5 U.S.C. § 552e) This notice is common on almost all federal government forms which seek to gather information from individuals, many of which seek personal and confidential details.

Department of Justice[edit]

Subsection “U” requires that each agency have a Data Integrity Board. Each agency’s Data Integrity Board is supposed to make an annual report to OMB, available to the public, that includes all complaints that the Act was violated, such as use of records for unauthorized reasons or the holding of First Amendment Records and report on —…”(v) any violations of matching agreements that have been alleged or identified and any corrective action taken”. Former Attorney General Dick Thornburg appointed a Data Integrity Board but since then, the USDOJ has not published any Privacy Act reports.[4]

Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act[edit]

The Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988, P.L. 100–503, amended the Privacy Act of 1974 by adding certain protections for the subjects of Privacy Act records whose records are used in automated matching programs. These protections have been mandated to ensure:

  • procedural uniformity in carrying out matching programs;
  • due process for subjects in order to protect their rights, and
  • oversight of matching programs through the establishment of Data Integrity Boards at each agency engaging in matching to monitor the agency’s matching activity.[5]

The Computer Matching Act is codified as part of the Privacy Act.[6]

Access to records[edit]

The Privacy Act also states:

Each agency that maintains a system of records shall—
  1. Upon request by any individual … permit him … to review the record and have a copy made of all or any portion thereof in a form comprehensible to him …
  2. Permit the individual to request amendment of a record pertaining to him …[2]

Issues of scope[edit]

The Privacy Act does apply to the records of every “individual,” defined as “a citizen of the United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence” [7] but the Privacy Act only applies to records held by an “agency”.[8] Therefore the records held by courts, executive components, or non-agency government entities are not subject to the provisions in the Privacy Act and there is no right to these records.[9]

On January 25, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order that eliminates Privacy Act protections for foreigners. Section 14 of Trump’s “Enhancing Public Safety” executive order directs federal agencies to “ensure that their privacy policies exclude persons who are not United States citizens or lawful permanent residents from the protections of the Privacy Act regarding personally identifiable information” to the extent consistent with applicable law.[10]

Exemptions[edit]

Following the controversial Passenger Name Record (PNR) agreement signed with the European Union (EU) in 2007, the Bush administration provided an exemption for the Department of Homeland Security and the Arrival and Departure Information System (ADIS) from the U.S. Privacy Act.[11] ADIS is intended to authorize people to travel only after PNR and API (Advance Passenger Information) data has been checked and cleared through a US agency watchlist.[11] The Automated Targeting System is also to be exempted.[11] The Privacy Act does not protect non-US persons, which is problematic for the exchange of Passenger Name Record information between the US and the European Union.